TITLE

100 Ma sweat bee nests: Early and rapid co-diversification of crown bees and flowering plants

AUTHOR(S)
Genise, Jorge Fernando; Bellosi, Eduardo S.; Sarzetti, Laura C.; Krause, J. Marcelo; Dinghi, Pablo A.; Sánchez, M. Victoria; Umazano, A. Martín; Puerta, Pablo; Cantil, Liliana F.; Jicha, Brian R.
PUB. DATE
January 2020
SOURCE
PLoS ONE;1/29/2020, Vol. 15 Issue 1, p1
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
100 Ma sweat bee nests reported herein are the oldest evidence of crown bees. A new phylogeny for short-tongued bees, calibrated with these nests dated with 40Ar/39Ar, attests for the first time for a late Albian rapid diversification of bees along with angiosperms. Such hypothesis lacked paleontological support until this study. The new ichnospecies Cellicalichnus krausei, which was found along with wasp trace fossils and new beetle trace fossils in the Castillo Formation of Patagonia, represents typical Halictini nests composed of sessile cells that are attached to main tunnels. According to geological, paleosol, paleobotanical, and ichnological data, bees, and angiosperms cohabited in an inland and dry environment comparable to an open dry woodland or savanna, under warm-temperate and semiarid-subhumid climate, in the Southern Hemisphere by the Albian.
ACCESSION #
141452074

 

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