TITLE

Past Change

PUB. DATE
September 2004
SOURCE
National Geographic;Sep2004, Vol. 206 Issue 3, p64
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Presents observations about the astronomical rhythms that affect climate change. Impact of the Earth's orbit around the sun on the timing of ice ages due to the changing distributions of sunlight over the Earth's surface; How past air temperatures affect the chemical makeup of snow that forms today's ice sheets; Indications about climate from fossil pollen grains which record ancient vegetation; Suggestion from historical data and computer models that the Earth may be in an extended interglacial period.
ACCESSION #
14141910

 

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