TITLE

The Elusive Costs of War

AUTHOR(S)
Garten, Jeffrey E.
PUB. DATE
April 2004
SOURCE
Bulletin with Newsweek;4/20/2004, Vol. 122 Issue 6417, p29
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
As America's occupation of Iraq takes a turn for the worse, there is a risk of widening collateral damage. As a market, Iraq is small potatoes in a $30 trillion dollar world economy. True, it has huge oil reserves, but since the country has been under international trade sanctions for the last decade, its absence as a major petroleum exporter will not have significant impact on global markets for awhile. The bigger danger of a long and difficult war is what it would do to politics and economics in the major industrial countries. In the U.S., for example, escalating military costs will add to serious fiscal strains that already exist.
ACCESSION #
12933220

 

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