TITLE

LITERACY LEARNING AND THE METAPHOR OF APPRENTICESHIP

AUTHOR(S)
Behrman, Edward H.
PUB. DATE
November 2003
SOURCE
College Reading Association Yearbook;2003, Issue 25, p128
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
This paper explores the usefulness and limitations of extending the apprenticeship metaphor to classroom-based literacy instruction. First, it discusses traditional apprenticeship from the perspective of Lave and Wenger's (1991) concept of legitimate peripheral participation and Wenger's (1998) social theory of learning. Then it presents and analyzes an exemplar of a reading apprenticeship recently published in Harvard Educational Review (Greenleaf Schoenbach, Cziko, & Mueller, 2001). In contrast to traditional apprenticeships, the reading apprenticeship appears to emphasize identity more than practice, and community more than meaning. The reading apprenticeship is characterized by social formation, rites of passage, and cultural systems. Less evident is concern for everyday activity in real-life settings, coordination of activity with community purpose, and the interaction of learners with environmental resources. It is proposed that other educational programs such as community-based project learning are more aligned with the principles of legitimate peripheral participation.
ACCESSION #
12907086

 

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