TITLE

Did You Know?

PUB. DATE
June 2002
SOURCE
Monkeyshines on Health & Science;Jun2002 Anatomy, p3
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
This article presents several facts, related to bones. More than half of the total bones of the body are found in the hands and feet. The largest bone in the human body is the femur. The strongest bone in the human body is the mandible or jaw bone. Bones are living organs that have blood vessels and nerves running through them. Places where bones come together are call joints. Bones are attached to other bones by strong straps called ligaments. The smallest bones of the body are found in the middle ear: the malleus, the incus and the stapes.
ACCESSION #
12866246

 

Related Articles

  • Anatomy of the lateral collateral ligament: a cadaver and histological study. Espregueira-Mendes; Vieira da Silva, M.; da Silva, M Vieira // Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy;Mar2006, Vol. 14 Issue 3, p221 

    This paper describes the anatomy of the lateral collateral ligament (LCL). The dimensions of the ligament and its femoral and fibular attachments are given. The relationships between the LCL and other anatomical structures are described, particularly the terminal fiber branches of the biceps...

  • EFFECT OF DISTAL HUMERAL VARUS DEFORMITY ON STRAIN IN THE LATERAL ULNAR COLLATERAL LIGAMENT AND ULNOHUMERAL JOINT STABILITY. Beuerlein, Murray J.; Reid, Jeffrey T.; Schemitsch, Emil H.; McKee, Michael D. // Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery, American Volume;Oct2004, Vol. 86-A Issue 10, p2235 

    Background: Recent reports have implicated cubitus varus deformity as a risk factor for the development of late posterolateral rotatory instability of the elbow. The purpose of this study was to determine the biomechanical relationship between cubitus varus and strain in the lateral ulnar...

  • Chapter 70: JOINTS.  // Understanding Surgery;2001, p274 

    The article presents information on the anatomy of joints. Joints connect one bony structure with another in the human body. The scientific names of the two major joints are diarthrosis and synarthrosis. Diarthrosis contains fluid and articulating synovium and cartilages. Synarthrosis is without...

  • condyle. Peters, Michael // BMA A-Z Family Medical Encyclopedia;2004, p190 

    A definition of the term "condyle" is presented. It refers to a round projection on the end of a bone that fits into a hollow on another bone to form a joint. Elbow is an example of a condyle.

  • CHAPTER 7: The Muscular System. Scanlon, Valerie C.; Sanders, Tina // Essentials of Anatomy & Physiology;Jan2007, p135 

    Chapter 7 of the book "Essentials of Anatomy & Physiology" is presented. Several clinical terminologies relating to the muscular system are listed. The structure of the muscle is described. The two types of muscle arrangements are the opposing antagonists and the cooperative synergists....

  • facet joint. Peters, Michael // BMA A-Z Family Medical Encyclopedia;2004, p294 

    An encyclopedia entry for "facet joint" is presented. Facet joint is found in the spine. It allows a degree of movement between vertebrae and gives the spine its flexibility. The joint is formed by the process of one vertebra fitting into a hollow in the vertebra above.

  • VISCERA - HAVE YOU GOT THE STOMACH FOR A NEW CHALLENGE? Robertson, Stuart // SportEX Dynamics;Oct2005, Issue 6, p10 

    Cast your mind back to your therapist's education. What were you taught about? Muscles, joints, ligaments, and nerves? How much time did you spend on the viscera? Does the musculoskeletal system exist in a vacuum? Bend forwards and backwards, now side to side. Do your insides move or do they...

  • Artificial Joints with a Lifetime Warranty. KD; Harrar, Sari // Prevention;May2003, Vol. 55 Issue 5, p196 

    Stress and activity can break down a fake joint's plastic parts, sloughing off tiny particles that inflame joint tissue and damage nearby bone.Researchers are experimenting with more durable metal and ceramic joint replacement parts that may one day replace polyethylene. Trials are currently...

  • Effects of changes in skiing posture on the kinetics of the knee joint. Koyanagi, Maki; Shino, Konsei; Yoshimoto, Yoji; Inoue, Satoru; Sato, Mutsumi; Nakata, Ken // Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy;Jan2006, Vol. 14 Issue 1, p88 

    This study was performed to investigate the effects of changes in the skiing posture on mechanical stress across the knee joint. The aim of the present study was to establish a safer form of skiing for the prevention of injury to the anterior cruciate ligament of the knee (ACL). Ten healthy...

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of THE LIBRARY OF VIRGINIA

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics