TITLE

Tropical Rain Forests...: "lungs of the planet"

AUTHOR(S)
Zawislak, Julie
PUB. DATE
January 2001
SOURCE
Monkeyshines on Health & Science;Jan2001 Botany, p14
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Within 4 square miles of a tropical rain forest there may be 1500 species of flowering plants, 750 of trees, 125 of mammals, 400 of birds, 60 of amphibians, and 150 of butterflies. No greater ecosystem on earth has more diversity. The rain forest is also a valuable source for many products, such as bamboo, rattan, natural rubber, medicinal plants, and oxygen. Deforestation is said to contribute to global warming and has caused extensive flooding. Man-made forest fires, set to clear the forest, release large amounts of carbon dioxide, which compounds the atmosphere problem.
ACCESSION #
12866195

 

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