TITLE

THE LIFE OF CIVILISATIONS

PUB. DATE
January 1922
SOURCE
Sociological Review (1908-1952);Jan22, Vol. 14 Issue 1, p51
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article focuses on cultural diversity. At the present time the world is divided between four great cultures, respectively European, Islamic, Indian and Chinese. Although the first of these has attained a kind of world hegemony, it has not eliminated the other three, nor has it succeeded in penetrating them internally. Any general theory of progress must take account of the organic development of these cultures, no less than of the material and scientific advance of modern civilization during the last four centuries, for they are the ultimate social entities in history and on this foundation all the racial and national strands are woven, Each of these cultures possesses a spiritual tradition of its own, which gives it an internal unity. this is most obvious in the case of Islam, where the civilization is also a religion, but it is no less true of the others and in each case this tradition rests on some synthesis which gives a common view of life and a common scale of values to all the civilization that it dominates. As long as a spiritual tradition of this kind controls a civilization, the latter possesses an inner unity such as in Europe during the Mediaeval period, or in Indian during the age of Guptas.
ACCESSION #
12743652

 

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