TITLE

Supreme Court Elections: How Much They Have Changed, Why They Changed, and What Difference It Makes

AUTHOR(S)
Baum, Lawrence
PUB. DATE
June 2017
SOURCE
Law & Social Inquiry;Summer2017, Vol. 42 Issue 3, p900
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
This essay draws on four recent studies of elections to state supreme courts in the United States to probe widely perceived changes in the scale and content of electoral campaigns for seats on state supreme courts.
ACCESSION #
124562618

 

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