TITLE

Productive and economic growth

AUTHOR(S)
McNicoll, I. H.; Robertson, I.
PUB. DATE
August 1980
SOURCE
Management Services;Aug1980, Vol. 24 Issue 8, p27
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
There is widespread agreement among the management services profession that improvements in productivity in British industry are of paramount importance. There has, however, been little discussion in the profession on merits or demerits which might arise from such productivity gains, although it is generally acknowledged that better productivity is not an end in itself but is rather a means to attaining other social or economic goals. One of the most important of the goals associated with improved productivity is that of economic growth. Firstly, it should be made clear that improved productivity will not automatically lead to higher growth rates. Strictly, better productivity per se reduces the inputs per unit of output and thereby releases resources which may be utilised in additional production of the same or other goods. Productivity gains therefore increase the economy's potential output, but whether this potential will be actually realised depends on other factors, particularly on the demand side.
ACCESSION #
12429667

 

Related Articles

  • CASE STUDY.  // Industrial Management;Jul/Aug2005, Vol. 47 Issue 4, p24 

    Presents a case study regarding the creation of a current-state capacity map to shorten the order lead-time of a company in a slightly growing market. Involvement of understanding the realistic demand in developing the working capacity maps; Concept of working maps; Specification of a to-be...

  • Sources of Chinese labor productivity growth: A structural decomposition analysis, 1987–2005 Yang, Ling; Lahr, Michael L. // China Economic Review (1043951X);Dec2010, Vol. 21 Issue 4, p557 

    Abstract: We decompose labor productivity growth from 1987 to 2005 by examining six partial factors (both supply and demand): changes in value-added coefficients, labor inputs, shares of sectoral demands that are fulfilled domestically, input mix, and the intra-sectoral shares and intersectoral...

  • SOME COMMENTS ON THE THEORY OF INERT AREAS AND THE DEFINITION OF X-EFFICIENCY. Blois, K. J. // Quarterly Journal of Economics;Nov74, Vol. 88 Issue 4, p681 

    This paper discusses concepts set out in by Harvey Leibenstein's Theory of Inert. The theory is developed around the utility-effort index relation. The inert area is defined as a set of effort positions whose associated levels of utility are not equal but in which the action required to go from...

  • Industry to Recover After Weak 2009. Kirgin, K. // Modern Casting;Jan2010, Vol. 100 Issue 1, p27 

    The article announces that improvements in the U.S. economy and industrial production will trigger an increase in casting demand. It notes that changes in technology and materials will affect casting shipments and lead to significant shifts in demand and supply sales. It reports that light...

  • Chinese economic growth will boost Asian acetic acid. Gibson, Jane // ICIS Chemical Business;1/30/2006, Vol. 1 Issue 4, p30 

    The article predicts that the economic growth in China will drive the market demand for Asian acetic acid in 2006. The projections of the Methanol Market Services Asia are presented. The profit margins posted by acetic producers are disclosed. Data is given on Asian acetic acid production. The...

  • Index Number Concepts, Measures and Decompositions of Productivity Growth. Diewert, W. Erwin; Nakamura, Alice O. // Journal of Productivity Analysis;Apr2003, Vol. 19 Issue 2/3, p127 

    This paper explores the definitions and properties of total factor productivity growth (TFPG) indexes, focusing especially on the Paasche, Laspeyres, Fisher, Tornqvist, and implicit Tomqvist ones. These indexes can be evaluated from observable price and quantity data, and certain of these are...

  • Causal Influences on Productivity Performance 1820-1992: A Global Perspective. Maddison, Angus // Journal of Productivity Analysis;Nov1997, Vol. 8 Issue 4, p325 

    This paper has three main purposes: a) it uses a comparative quantitative framework to demonstrate the pace of economic growth in different parts of the world economy since 1820, and to identify the major causes which have been operative; b) it analyses the different approaches which economists...

  • TOTAL FACTOR PRODUCTIVITY GROWTH, TECHNOLOGICAL PROGRESS AND TECHNICAL EFFICIENCY CHANGE: DIMENSIONS OF PRODUCTIVITY CHANGE IN YUGOSLAVIA, 1965-78. Nishimizu, Mieko; Page Jr., John M. // Economic Journal;Dec82, Vol. 92 Issue 368, p920 

    The objective of this paper is to propose a methodology that decomposes total factor productivity change into technological progress and changes in technical efficiency. We define technological progress as the change in the best practice production frontier, and establish its rate by direct...

  • Accounting for Irish growth: a balance-of-payments-constraint approach. Garcimartín, Carlos; Rivas, Luis Alberto; Diaz de Sarralde, Santiago // Journal of Post Keynesian Economics;Spring2008, Vol. 30 Issue 3, p409 

    Less than 20 years ago, the Irish economy was tired and sluggish, suffering from double-digit unemployment and stagnating incomes. Today, Ireland's ‘Celtic tiger’ economy is one of the fastest growing in the world, exceeding average EU per capita income levels and boasting a...

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of THE LIBRARY OF VIRGINIA

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics