TITLE

African ivory flooding East Asia

AUTHOR(S)
Amodeo, Christian
PUB. DATE
February 2004
SOURCE
Geographical (Campion Interactive Publishing);Feb2004, Vol. 76 Issue 2, p15
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Reports on the growth of ivory trade in China and Thailand in 2004. Demand for ivory items in retail outlets; Share of ivory sales in the retail growth of China; Policies from the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species about the marketing of ivory stocks.
ACCESSION #
12156851

 

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