TITLE

German patients rush to doctors before new €10 charge starts

AUTHOR(S)
Tuffs, Annette; Heidelberg
PUB. DATE
January 2004
SOURCE
BMJ: British Medical Journal (International Edition);1/3/2004, Vol. 328 Issue 7430, p8
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Discusses the health reforms in Germany which will require patients to pay €10 for their initial visit to their doctor. Subsequent visits for the following three months which will be free; Other issues which include payments for drugs and eyeglasses; Disagreements between physicians and the health ministry; Financial risks for the physicians.
ACCESSION #
11903193

 

Related Articles

  • What Is Reform in Health Care? Schorr, Alvin L. // Social Work;May92, Vol. 37 Issue 3, p263 

    The article briefly outlines the health care reform that is necessary to overcome health problems. Three qualities of the collage-the competitive insurance system, physician reimbursement, and hospital competition are at the heart of the difficulties of the health reforms. To overcome these...

  • Acceptability of the electronic health insurance card to practising physicians. Kersnik, Janko // Quality in Primary Care;Mar2003, Vol. 11 Issue 1, p41 

    Background Cost containment in the transition countries of Central and Eastern Europe is a key issue in healthcare reforms. The electronic health insurance card is a potential method for controlling financial flow in a healthcare system. The Slovene National Insurance Institute has launched a...

  • Health Care Reform and Reimbursement From an Insurer's Perspective.  // Neurology Reviews;Jan2011, Vol. 19 Issue 1, p1 

    The article focuses on the remarks of UnitedHealth Group Inc. executive vice president Reed V. Tuckson on health care reform legislation and reimbursement in the U.S. Tuckson stresses the significance for clinicians and researchers to find novel innovations that improve medical care and reduce...

  • Fee-for-all. Zigmond, Jessica // Modern Healthcare;9/12/2011, Vol. 41 Issue 37, p6 

    The article discusses a research study conducted at Columbia University which found that physician fees are the source of increased spending in U.S. physicians' incomes. The study indicated the differences in paying for the costs of medical education and the relative contribution of payments per...

  • Hell no, we won't ACO. Evans, Melanie // Modern Healthcare;6/6/2011, Vol. 41 Issue 23, p6 

    The article deals with the proposed rule issued by the U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) for accountable care organizations (ACOs) in March 2011. Particular focus is given to healthcare executives' reaction to the proposed rule. According to the American Hospital Association,...

  • The post-health care reform Medicare aBC's. Smith, Mike // Benefits Selling;May2010, Vol. 8 Issue 5, p75 

    The article presents an alphabet which explains the effect of the health care reform act on Medicare. In Part A of Medicare, hospital benefits will be reduced beginning in 2010 through 2015 with some hospitals receiving higher Medicare payments, while Part B on outdoor facility and doctor office...

  • Regulatory/Legislative. Health care reform: Congress creates Independent Payment Advisory Board. Zimmerman, Eric; Radensky, Paul W. // Ocular Surgery News;9/10/2010, Vol. 28 Issue 17, p42 

    The article focuses on the Independent Payment Advisory Board (IPAB), a panel set up by the U.S. Congress to monitor Medicare expenses. It says that IPAB is the result of health care legislation, and has the power to suggest practices which may come into law. IPAB's other cited function is to...

  • Providers Fear Costs of Medical Reform Could Outweigh Benefits. Webb, Marion // San Diego Business Journal;10/19/2009, Vol. 30 Issue 42, p17 

    The article reports on the costs of health care reform that could outweigh benefits of providers in San Diego, California. It notes that health leaders expresses their fears on the Medicare and Medicaid program that might expand for elderly, poor and disabled whose reimbursement rates do not...

  • WE'RE NOT DUMMIES, SO WHY CAN'T WE FIX MEDICARE--ONCE AND FOR ALL? Colvin, Geoff // Fortune;7/4/2011, Vol. 164 Issue 1, p53 

    The article looks at the rising cost of the U.S. Medicare health insurance program for the elderly and disabled, and compares various proposals for slowing its cost growth. The author argues that implementing program-wide rules to limit spending does not work, and instead suggests that funds be...

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of THE LIBRARY OF VIRGINIA

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics