TITLE

Playing it badly

AUTHOR(S)
Walsh, Max
PUB. DATE
September 1998
SOURCE
Bulletin with Newsweek;09/29/98, Vol. 117 Issue 6142, p38
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Discusses the political campaign of the Coalition government and Prime Minister John Howard leading up to the October 1998 federal elections in Australia. Howard's election strategy; Australian Labor Party possibly gaining a lead over the Coalition; Coalition failing to use advantages the global crisis and concern over the economy give it; Public fear of a goods and services tax (GST).
ACCESSION #
1136307

 

Related Articles

  • Why hard times could favor Howard. Skeffington, Robert // BRW;09/07/98, Vol. 20 Issue 34, p30 

    Reports on the 1998 federal election campaign and how a focus on the economy can help Prime Minister John Howard's government win. Their plan for economic reform in their tax package coinciding with an unstable period in the global economy; The Australian Labor Party's inability to engage in...

  • Public pulse. Milne, Sue // Bulletin with Newsweek;09/22/98, Vol. 117 Issue 6141, p17 

    Presents information on the October 1998 elections in Australia and statistics on voting intentions. Australian voter's choice between John Howard and Kim Beazley for prime minister; Chart of federal voting intentions; Percentages held by the Australian Labor Party and the Liberal and National...

  • Howard Gets Desperate. Richardson, Graham // Bulletin with Newsweek;09/29/98, Vol. 117 Issue 6142, p35 

    Discusses the political campaign of Liberal Party coalition Prime Minister John Howard leading up to the October 1998 federal elections in Australia. The speech in which Howard implied that to vote for the Australian Labor Party (ALP) was to put self-interest before the national interest;...

  • Labor slips at the start. Robb, Andrew // Bulletin with Newsweek;09/15/98, Vol. 117 Issue 6140, p36 

    Presents the author's opinion on a variety of topics in the Australian election campaign of 1998. Prime Minister John Howard and Minister Peter Costello coming out ahead of the Australian Labor Party's (ALP) Kim Beazley in the first week of the election campaign; ALP's campaign to boil down to a...

  • One Nation Could Tip Scales. Robb, Andrew // Bulletin with Newsweek;09/29/98, Vol. 117 Issue 6142, p32 

    Discusses the campaign for the October 1998 federal elections in Australia. Australian Labor Party's (ALP) strategy of attacking the government's plans for a goods and services tax (GST); Government benefiting from the short time until the election; The One Nation party seen as the wild card;...

  • Beazley shows his mettle. Oakes, Laurie // Bulletin with Newsweek;09/15/98, Vol. 117 Issue 6140, p34 

    Discusses how the Australian Labor Party (ALP) and its leader, Kim Beazley are responding to the government's goods and services tax (GST) in order to win the October 1998 elections. Beazley attacking the GST; Beazley showing that he has the toughness to do it; ALP needing to show that the...

  • Coalition plays footsie into Labor's hands. Oakes, Laurie // Bulletin with Newsweek;08/11/98, Vol. 117 Issue 6135, p37 

    Discusses how the rise of the One Nation party in Australia may have made it impossible for Prime Minister John Howard to win the 1999 election in his own right. Australian Labor Party (ALP) believing that it alone has the ability to win a majority in the House of Representatives; Concerns of...

  • Watch for electoral fallout from GST deal. Oakes, Laurie // Bulletin with Newsweek;06/08/99, Vol. 117 Issue 6177, p30 

    Discusses the political implications of the deal between the Australian government and the Australian Democrats for the goods and service tax (GST). Government dealing with the Democrats to get the GST passed in the Senate; How Prime Minister John Howard successfully negotiated with Democratic...

  • Beware the desperate politician bearing tax gifts. Oakes, Laurie // Bulletin with Newsweek;08/18/98, Vol. 117 Issue 6136, p39 

    Reports on how Prime Minister John Howard and his coalition party must make the goods and services tax (GST) they are proposing look attractive enough to voters to pull the party out of a slump in the polls. How the political nature of the GST has changed; Benefits to the party if they convince...

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of THE LIBRARY OF VIRGINIA

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics