TITLE

Mesoscale Convection and Bimodal Cyclogenesis over the Bay of Bengal

AUTHOR(S)
Akter, Nasreen
PUB. DATE
September 2015
SOURCE
Monthly Weather Review;Sep2015, Vol. 143 Issue 9, p3495
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) are an essential component of cyclogenesis, and their structure and characteristics determine the intensity and severity of associated cyclones. Case studies were performed by simulating tropical cyclones that formed during the pre- and postmonsoon periods in 2007 and 2010 over the Bay of Bengal (BoB). The pre- (post) monsoon environment was characterized by the coupling of northwesterly (southwesterly) wind to the early advance southwesterly (northeasterly) monsoonal wind in the BoB. The surges of low-level warm southwesterlies with clockwise-rotating vertical shear in the premonsoon period and moderately cool northeasterlies with anticlockwise-rotating vertical shear in the postmonsoon period transported moisture and triggered MCSs within preexisting disturbances near the monsoon trough over the BoB. Mature MCSs associated with bimodal cyclone formations were quasi linear, and they featured leading-edge deep convection and a trailing stratiform precipitation region, which was very narrow in the postmonsoon cases. In the premonsoon cases, the MCSs became severe bow echoes when intense and moist southwesterlies were imposed along the dryline convergence zone in the northern and northwestern BoB. However, the development formed a nonsevere and nonorganized linear system when the convergence zone was farther south of the dryline. In the postmonsoon cases, cyclogenesis was favored by squall-line MCSs with a north-south orientation over the BoB. All convective systems moved quickly, persisted for a long time, and contained suitable environments for developing low-level cyclonic mesovortices at their leading edges, which played an additional role in forming mesoscale convective vortices during cyclogenesis in the BoB.
ACCESSION #
109171891

 

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