TITLE

JENNINGS V. STEPHENS (13-7211)

AUTHOR(S)
Koskella, Nathan K.; Taylor, Ellen
PUB. DATE
January 2015
SOURCE
Federal Lawyer;Jan/Feb2015, Vol. 62 Issue 1, p81
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article discusses the court case Jennings v. Stephens, in which U.S. Supreme Court will decide whether a federal habeas petitioner must file a Certificate of Appealability (COA) and mentions that according to Jennings, a prisoner on death row, he was not required to obtain a COA.
ACCESSION #
108895935

 

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