TITLE

rakkasan!

AUTHOR(S)
Laurence, John
PUB. DATE
August 2003
SOURCE
Esquire;Aug2003, Vol. 140 Issue 2, p112
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Describes the experience of the 3rd Battalion of the Elite 101st Airborne in the U.S.-led war in Baghdad, Iraq. Objective of the Battalion; Description of the men included in the Battalion; Most problematic tactical exercise of a professional battalion staff; Details of the military operation.
ACCESSION #
10222809

 

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