TITLE

Let's Do a Study

AUTHOR(S)
Sedulus
PUB. DATE
August 1970
SOURCE
New Republic;8/1/70, Vol. 163 Issue 5, p32
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Discusses the history of studies on the impact to children of television violence in the United States. Relationship between aggressive behavior in children and what they watch; National Association of Broadcasters (NAB) president Harold E. Fellows' promise to the Senate that NAB will undertake a study about the impact of television violence in 1954; Eisenhower Commission's finding that the habitual viewing of violence on television increases the likelihood of aggressive behavior; Reactions of television companies concerning studies about television violence.
ACCESSION #
10123247

 

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