TITLE

Palestinians Pay a High Price for Justice

AUTHOR(S)
Marshall, Rochelle
PUB. DATE
March 2015
SOURCE
Washington Report on Middle East Affairs;Mar/Apr2015, Vol. 34 Issue 2, p8
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article focuses on the sacrifice Palestinians in the West Bank and Gaza have to endure for justice. Topics discussed include the violence of the Israel Defense Forces against Palestinian children and adults in the West Bank, the effort of Palestinians to take part in negotiations with Israel to end its occupation, and the Palestinian state's membership to the International Criminal Court (ICC). Also mentioned is the possible impact if a Palestianian case goes before the court.
ACCESSION #
100886104

 

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